What are compression calf sleeves?

What are calf compression sleeves?

graduated leg compression sleeveMore people are learning the importance of living a healthy lifestyle, but many of those who exercise on a regular basis struggle with problems confined to the lower leg area. DinoDerm calf compression sleeves are designed with graduated compression (slightly tighter at the ankle and a bit looser at the top of the calf) to promote blood circulation in addition to stabilization and overall compression.

Our product is engineered to help athletes prevent or recover from lower leg pain, including shin splints, Achilles Tendonitis, inflammation, strains, sprains, and cramping. A large range of seemingly innocent exercises can lead to debilitating injuries, leaving the athlete on the sidelines for weeks or months before being able to resume moderate exercise. For instance, shin splints are incredibly common, accounting for between 13-17% of all sports injuries.*

What if I’m feeling good, is there any point to wearing calf sleeves?

Yes, in fact, most top athletes, whether marathon runners, triathletes, or basketball players you see on television, wear compression sleeves to prevent injury. Subjecting the body to the harsh forces associated with sustained activity puts an enormous strain on the lower leg…twisting, stop-and-go, sprinting, and the shock of jogging on a hard surface are all dependent upon your calf muscles being able to absorb forces, transfer energy in a new direction, and endure long stretches of physical activity. Calf sleeves help to stabilize your lower leg, improve blood flow, and keep the muscles and tendons warm.

Who do they fit?

DinoDerm compression sleeves are approximately 11.5in/29cm long and designed to fit the average person’s calf, both in length and circumference. They are not a full sock, so can be adjusted and worn either closer to the knee or ankle, depending upon the user’s preference

  1. *Clement D., Taunton J., Smart G. (1981). “A survey of overuse running injuries”. The Physician and Sports Medicine 9, 47–58.
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